Data Codes + Key Findings

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1CbH4yd5wmwiBCnoy0ANc4V2nc3knZkRcEdYJv3I_CEA/edit?usp=sharing

Older Gen Z members want to shop from more sustainable first-hand retailers but state price as the primary barrier.

22–24 year-olds are more likely than 19–21 year-olds to budget $50+ for an everyday outfit.

Older Gen Z members define sustainable fashion as buying second-hand clothes, mainly through thrifting at brick and mortar.

Older Gen Z members will prioritize convenience over sustainability.

People aged 19–21 who primarily purchased first-hand clothes within the past year were likely to never or sometimes research a brand’s environmental impact before buying.

People aged 19–21 who primarily purchased second-hand clothes within the past year are likely to often or always research a brand’s environmental impact before buying.

Older Gen Z members are primarily concerned with major fashion retailers’ ethical practices, particularly their labor conditions.

Older Gen Z members are learning about sustainable fashion practices through social media platforms like Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok.

Older Gen Z members characterize fast fashion clothes as trendy, cheap, and low-quality.

Older Gen Z members acknowledge major corporations as drivers of unsustainability but still consider personal sustainability initiatives.